After being a business owner for more than 5 years, I have decided to get back into corporate life. How long should I plan to be in this "newbie" / adjusting stage? I'm a month in and don't feel completely settled yet.

I work in an office where some of the guy employees goof off all day while the rest of us do all the work. They are well liked by the bosses and schmooze with the bosses over sports at every opportunity. It is infuriating that the rest of us have to work so hard to make up for those who do not work. Should I complain to the bosses?

At some point in almost every job interview, the interviewer asks for my current salary. I
presume it is because they don’t want to reveal the salary range they have in mind and they want to not over pay. I have read that a job candidate should avoid answering this question. But I would not want to be perceived negatively by the interviewer if I don’t answer a question. So should an interviewee answer the question about their current salary?

Jefferey

I have been unemployed for a long time. I have many more years of experience for almost every job I see listed on the job boards. Should I apply for positions for which I am over qualified?

I get paid a great salary, have a lot of flexibility in my schedule, and for the most part don't have a ton of pressure. But I got passed over for promotion in favor of someone less qualified and now have to report to him, which is making me a little nuts. And the office feels like it's slowly dying.

It seems like it is extremely easy to find a job/internship in the Bay Area; however, I have been living here for a year and a half and couldn’t find any good paid position. Most of the times, it is disappointing that the employers do not call me for an interview regardless of how much time and effort I spent to write the cover letters. It saddens me that most of my classmates have found jobs/internships through the same process that I followed. I am tired of hunting jobs from the job listings, and I often think why I am unfortunate in finding a paid position.

Graduation is drawing closer and closer. Everyone will have prestigious internships and jobs lined up for themselves while I will probably be getting ready to move in with my parents. Should I even put myself through the stress of the application process? Or should I strip off all my clothes and live off berries and rainwater in the woods like a forest nymph?

I am a 20-year old college student and have been consistently employed since I was 15. Aside from summer internships/shadowing, I have only had two jobs - a retail job in high school and a UC Press publishing production assistant (current). I have been working as a production assistant for the past 3 years of college, and it is a very comfortable and well-paying job that I enjoy and have a great relationship with my boss. But is it time to move on? Is it more impressive on a resume to have more jobs worked for a shorter period or time, or fewer jobs that I have committed to for longer time?

I am a third year college student that, as of last year, decided my previous path, engineering, isn't more me. I have always had a passion for education, and would like to pursue that as a career. With this big shift in life path, I feel like I need to take a break for a year or two and gather myself before moving onto the next step, and have been considering adventurous options such as the Peace Corps, Teach for America, or working at the outdoor education program at the (AWESOME) camp I work at during the summer. However, I have an opportunity to have graduate school paid for me if I attend directly from college. I don't like the idea of going straight from kindergarten to masters degree, and would like to adventure a bit and experience real life after college, so now I'm confused.

I am a college student trying to decide how to spend the summer before my senior year. For the past 2 summers, I have done professional internships. This summer, I am considering pursuing another internship, studying abroad, or working at a summer camp. An internship would help me get a great job when I graduate from college and I would likely earn a good amount of money. Studying abroad is an opportunity I will probably only have access to as a college student and I've heard from friends that it can be an amazing experience. Working at a summer camp would be a great way to destress and relax while also earning money. Which should I choose?

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